6th May

W’s education this week seemed to take the form of her explaining things to me that she has learned over the last few weeks. This really helps to ‘solidify’ her learning and I can add in any bits that I think she has missed. She loves to explain things to me (probably because she is tired of me constantly telling her things……) instead of just listening to my voice all the time.

So here is what we did this week, in order of subject:

Nature / Biology: W explained to me how bees use their 5 eyes to see and then went on to explain the differences between insects and spiders. This is something she picked up on a TV program ages ago, but had remembered those facts from it.

W later told me how some baby fish hide from predators in their mothers’ mouth. She wanted to know how baby fish are made – we discussed this and looked for clips on Youtube. She also described the blue whale and then explained how big it is.

We played at vets with her toys and within the game she told me all about blood tests and what they are for. She knows a little about blood cells and this was all incorporated into our game.

W has also been learning the names of different plants and flowers, when we are out and about. She can recognise quite a few now, which is impressive since I know very little about flowers…

We learned about how wheat is milled with an educational resource that I had from a while ago. It has packets of wheat from various different points of the milling process and it explains what happens to is and what each different part is used for.

Literacy / English: We got W’s activity books and magazines out and she did quite a few pages of colouring-in, spot the difference, copying pictures, stickering and writing practise.

Also, we again categorised some of her Shopkins toys (this time into ‘seasons’) and she wrote labels for each section.

Maths: On the train to a park, we did some mental arithmetic (she was giving me sums to do, then working out the answer herself), which W worked out in her own way. For some questions, she counted on her fingers, but for others, she seemed to just know the answer.

On another day, W bought a couple of new toys with her pocket money (more about pocket money here) and added up how much money she had for them, to work out if she had enough.

We later watched a few episodes of the number show from Alphablocks, on CBeebies together.

PE: At swimming, W swam on her back this time and generally played a lot in the pool.

Politics: I took W with me to vote in the local election, where we talked about the political parties, government, what they do and how they are funded. This is something W is really interested. In the past, she has asked lots of questions on democracy and why people vote differently from each other. I’m sure we will expand on this a lot as she grows up.

Play: W, D and J played a long imaginative game, where all of their soft toys went camping.  They packed lots of items for the toys and brought them downstairs in suitcases, then put up the tent and played at camping with them. It was great to see them playing together so well and collaborating well on what should happen next in the game.

Although this seems like a lot of learning now that I have written it down, this was definitely one of our ‘quiet’ weeks. However, it goes to show that, whether I am actively ‘teaching’ Willow or not, she is learning all the time of her own accord. I see that my role here is to facilitate her learning and to be guided by her. She will learn what she is ready to learn, when she needs to learn it. I am so struck by the fact that she is so eager to absorb information and facts, without me instigating it. When I first found out about home education (when I was pregnant with W), I thought it would involve much more guidance from me. I must say that I did think W would want to do nothing all day if I let her. As she grew, she showed me that she was always learning and that what I needed to do was to simply observe and to provide opportunities for learning. The rest is down to her. And she is doing brilliantly.

21st Jan 2018 – Pocket Money

Our learning this week began with a long conversation as we were travelling through London. W wanted to know how ice melts, so we talked about temperatures and solids turning into liquids (all explained in a way that she can grasp at age 4 and 3 quarters). We also passed by some celebrations for the Chinese New Year, so we had a long chat about what it means and how it is celebrated.

She wanted to know again how an underground tunnel is built, so we talked a bit about that too, and I made a mental note to take her to the Transport Museum in the future, so that she can see some examples of how it was done. While we were on the underground, W wanted to count the steps whenever we went up or down some, so we did that, checking her knowledge of numbers over 20.

Once we were on a train, W asked to do some colouring-in (good pen practise) and then did a page from a workbook on rhyming words, which she enjoyed. I find that, if W does ask to do some work on paper, she will often only do one sheet or two maximum. As I said before, I am not pushing her to do any at this stage as I want her to enjoy it and not see it as a chore.

I give W a small amount of pocket money to help her get used to the value of money and to hopefully learn about the benefits of saving versus spending. At the moment, she likes to spend it as soon as she gets it on a small item. She wants the bigger items and is slightly disappointed that she can’t have them because they cost more than she has. When this happens, I do explain about saving and the fact that she could afford bigger items if she waited a week, but W is still at the stage where she would rather have a little item now instead of a bigger toy in a week. That is fine by me, but hopefully she will learn delayed gratification in time.

On the subject of pocket money, I don’t give money for routine chores around the house as I believe that chores are for the good of the family and none of us get paid for them. I worry that W will grow up not wanting to do chores if she does not gain from them, whereas the true gain from chores is simply living in a tidy house where we can relax. The Washington Post had an interesting article on the subject…. So, an allowance it is! W counted her money (with help) while we were out to see if she could afford a particular toy or not (we are at the ‘is this a bigger or smaller number than this?’ stage so far) and was delighted that she had enough!

Readers: at what age do you think children should get pocket money, if at all? Do your children have an allowance or do they work for money? I’m keen to hear your opinions on this one.

On the way home from our shopping trip, we walked through a park and W asked what breeds the different ducks were. I knew a few, but we also had to look up a few on my phone. We both learned something then!

At home, W played with the fridge magnets and asked how they worked and why they stuck to metal. We tried them on different materials to see which ones they would stay on to and which they wouldn’t. We touched on the science of magnets a little also.

Later, we had a conversation on politics… W wanted to know why people would vote for a president who is not nice to everyone. It was a hard question to answer, but we did cover the subjects of democracy and majorities and also the media and people’s own beliefs. In the end, I don’t think W understood why people would vote a certain way, but at least she learned a little bit about how democracy works (or sometimes doesn’t….).

This week, W asked us to read more of the Lift-the-flap Science book and she really liked the sections on evolution, energy and electricity this time.

As with almost every week of our lives, Lego construction featured heavily, with all the educational benefits and opportunity for valuable playtime. Another brilliant game that featured this week was all three children (current ages 9, 7 and 4) setting up a ‘museum’ together. They brought toys to their museum to use as exhibits, made written signs and collaborated together to decide how much they should charge people to visit and how that money should be spent in the museum!

Whilst we were out on an errand, we spotted an engineer working in a hole in the ground, fixing communication cables. We stopped to have a look and he very kindly chatted to W about what he was doing and why. This was an excellent spontaneous lesson for her – the type that we can never really plan for, but are a welcome surprise when they do happen. I’m always grateful to those people who take time out of their working day to talk to an inquisitive child. It not only helps them to learn, but increases children’s confidence and social skills too.

On that note, I had to do some work on my business myself, as I do every day when W is happily engaged in something, or asleep. W decided that she wanted to help me, so I asked her to count items for me and add them together. She did very well and managed about 20 minutes. Any work that the children do on my business is paid work, but they never have to do it. They can choose to do real work at any time and they also choose when to stop as well. They usually do a maximum of and hour and a half per week each, if they do any at all and I think that is fine. They are paid for the work that they do and can choose to do it at almost any time.

We had our usual board games before bed every evening and the children chose mainly games with numbers in, like this Orchard Toys Bus Stop Game.

One day this week, W wanted to learn to count backwards, so we had a go at that.

We also went to one of our regular social groups this week. W had a great time playing table tennis, building towers with blocks, matching numbers with dominoes and playing chase with the other children. When we had finished there, we went to a cafe and W started counting things again. She had a go at counting in twos at one point, so we spent a bit of time on the two times table.

Reading all this, it seems that W learned so much in the course of a regular week. I am so happy that we are able to do this organically and at her own pace… and I hope that because of this, she will never lose her zest for learning…